May 25, 2022  
2021 - 2022 Academic Catalog 
    
2021 - 2022 Academic Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Associate Degree Nursing/Registered Nurse


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Pre-Bachelor of Science in Nursing (leading to BSN/RN)

Academic Advisor

Annissa Jackson

Department Mission

To assist students to achieve higher levels of education and training through an improved education system that promotes seamless academic progression. Whether nursing students take the pre-BSN track, the concurrent ADN/BSN track, or the ADN to BSN track to earn their Registered Nursing license, all professional nursing students should be prepared to earn the BSN.

Department Objectives

  • To promote the Institute of Medicine’s (IOM’s) goal of increasing the number of BSN prepared nurses to meet the growing demand for professional nurses needed by preparing students to enter basic BSN programs or
  • To prepare students to enter the ADN program with core completion so they are ready to complete the BSN with one additional year of school after completing the ADN (1+2+1)

Job Outlook

According to the Occupation Outlook Handbook (accessed 2/18/2021), employment of registered nurses is projected to grow 7 percent from 2019 to 2029, faster than the average for all occupations. Growth will occur for a number of reasons, including an increased emphasis on preventive care; growing rates of chronic conditions, such as diabetes and obesity; and demand for healthcare services from the baby boomer population, as they live longer and more active lives. With the pre-BSN track, students will only be ready for gainful employment if they complete the ADN or BSN degree and earn the Registered Nursing (RN) license.

Registered Nurse (RN)

Registered nurses (RNs) provide patient-centered care while functioning as a patient safety advocate, a member of the health care team and a member of the profession within the nurses’ legal/ethical scope of practice. Professional nursing (RN) requires a large base of knowledge used to assess, plan and intervene to promote health, prevent disease, recover from illness, or help patients and families cope with impending death. They are health educators and advocates for patients and families. When providing patient care, nurses observe, assess and record data, patient reactions and progress. The nurse analyzes this data to plan and implement clinical judgment, interventions, and evaluate outcomes.

RNs have a unique scope of practice and can practice independently, although they also collaborate with all members of the health care team to provide the care needed by each patient as an individual or member of a family.

Roles range from direct patient care and case management to establishing nursing practice standards, developing quality assurance procedures, directing complex nursing care systems, conducting clinical research and teaching in nursing programs, as well as practicing in many other settings. While state laws govern the scope of nursing practice, patient needs typically determine a nurse’s daily job activities.

Professional nursing responsibilities have changed considerably over time. Nurses today are highly respected and valued members of the health care team who bring their own body of knowledge to the process of health care.

Chair/Academic Advisor

Annissa Jackson

Professors

  • Christine Gish
  • Annissa Jackson
  • Kimberly Jones
  • Julie Leming
  • Sharon Peace
  • Donna Singleton
  • Joslyn Sullen
  • Laura Witherspoon

Department Mission

To facilitate an educational environment to foster the development of caring, ethical, competent, novice professional nurses. As such, we contribute to the progression of the nursing profession.

Department Objectives

  • To prepare novice professional nurses prepared to take NCLEX-RN exam for licensure and provide safe and competent care in professional nursing practice
  • To promote the transition of the Licensed Vocational Nurse into the role of the Registered Nurse.

Job Outlook

According to the Occupational Outlook Handbook (accessed 2/18/21), employment of registered nurses is projected to grow 7 percent from 2019 to 2029, faster than the average for all occupations. Growth will occur for a number of reasons, including an increased emphasis on preventive care; growing rates of chronic conditions, such as diabetes and obesity; and demand for healthcare services from the baby boomer population, as they live longer and more active lives. Registered nurses work in hospitals, physicians’ offices, home healthcare services, and nursing care facilities. Others work in correctional facilities, schools, or serve in the military.

Areas of Specialization

  • Staff Nurse
  • Labor and Delivery Nurse
  • Neonatal Nurse
  • Pediatric Nurse
  • Critical Care Nurse
  • Emergency Room Nurse
  • Nurse Educator
  • Oncology Nurse
  • Orthopedic Nurse
  • Nephrology Nurse
  • Hospice/Palliative Care Nurse
  • Mental Health Nurse
  • Public Health Nurse/Home Health Nurse
  • School Nurse
  • Advance Practice Nurse (Nurse Practitioner, Nurse Anesthetist, etc.) - requires additional education

 

For more information, email adn@panola.edu or call 903-693-2038 for advising

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